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Cambridge, Alice Mildred Lawn Tennis 1985

The name Mildred Cambridge has been a household one in local lawn tennis over four decades, although it was at hockey that she gained national honours first. Her first island-wide success was in 1936 when she won the ladies' double title with Mrs. Dolly Fisher. Three year later the pair repeated their success, Miss Cambridge having won the singles the previous year. During the forties she was singles champion no less than six times, five years in succession, 1944-48 inclusive. Over the 25 years period from her first singles success, 1938-1962, she only failed to win a title twice 1949 and 1951. Up to 1951 she had no liens on the ladiesí doubles crown but had twin successes in 1947 teaming up with Mrs. Mary Eyre and 1950, when Mrs. Dolly Fisher was her partner. As is usual with players who have slowed with time, she played more doubles matches and was joint winner in both the ladies' and mixed doubles, six times each - ladies' 1953-57 inclusive, all with Mrs. Odette Galt and 1959 with Mrs. Anita De Verteuil; mixed 1952-54 inclusive, all with Jin Ho; and 57-59 inclusive, she was partnered by Alan Price.

 

But she still found the energy to participate in singles competition and five times found winners' row - 1950, 1952, 1953, 1957 and 1959. The fifties must be considered her finest decade, as she became triple-crown champion on three occasions, the last three during her singles' reign in '53, '57 and '59. Her ladies' partner for the last feat was Mrs. Anita De Verteuil.

 

When the decade of the sixties began, it marked twenty-five years since she won her first title. There was no letting up, for she won the singles that year and found similar success in the ladies' doubles tournament to register a 'hat-trick' with Mrs. De Verteuil as well as in singles play. She then added the mixed doubles title with Michael Valdez in 1962 and ladies' doubles in 1965 with Mrs. De Verteuil to her bulging collection. But the best was yet to come. In the fashion of a true champion she won the Triple Crown in 1966, after which she decided to retire. It was a fitting climax to a wonderful career. Sharing in her final triumph were Alan Price and Yvonne Trestrail.

 

She changed partners very rarely during her doubles campaign and apart from Messrs. Valdez and Trestrail already mentioned, the only person with whom she shared a title once, was Ruth Thavenot with whom she played in 1940, Miss Thavenot's triple-crown year. She accomplished all her successes without having to use any backhand strokes. Instead she used a forehand while scooping the ball from her body. Afterwards she served on the Northern Lawn Tennis Council for many years and donated the ìCambridge Cupî for "B" class Inter-club competition. There was no competition such as the Phillips Trophy in her days and inter-territorial competition was limited to exchanges by the Demarara Club of British Guiana and the Savannah Tennis Club, Barbados. She was usually victorious in those matches. In 1947 she defeated Miss Jean Quertier who was the hard courts Triple Crown champion of Northern England, 6-1, 7-9, 6-3. Two years later she made her first representative trip to the Caribbean Championships held at Montego Bay, with Ian Mc Donald. There she beat the American player Virginia Lee Boyer 4-6, 12-10, 6-3.

 

In hockey she played at full back and first represented her country in 1929, then held her position until 1939. The sport was not popular in neighbouring West Indian islands and the opposition came only from British Guiana. Between inter colonial games and her tennis commitments she played for Wanderers, perennial champions in that era. She restarted in 1946, was captain in 1947, 1948, 1950 and 1952, the year of her retirement from the sport. At that time she held the post of Vice President of the Trinidad and Tobago Women's Hockey Association.



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Campbell, Donald Horse Racing 1984

There is unanimity among old timers in horse racing that Donald Campbell was indeed the prince among jockeys at the turn of the century. He was born on October 18, 1885. He was a mere bit of a lad going to scale at not more than 70 lbs when he rode his first horse in 1903.

 

It was no storybook ride since he finished second in a three-horse field at the Queen's Park Savannah.

 

In later years, he was to become the champion jockey of Trinidad and Tobago and Pen Bennett said openly time and again that once Campbell had a ride you didn't know you won a race until reaching the post. Campbell had a knack of just pipping you on the wire and would hail out, "ah catch you". This was prior to the photo-finish camera. He rode first call for owner/trainer E.A. Robinson (father of Sir Harold Robinson) who raced the Woodford Lodge Stables and his lone Derby success came in the twilight of his career in 1932 astride Mintips. There is no record of his winners, but close relatives said in the vicinity of 500 and unlike Bennett, Johnny Marcelle and McDonald Aird who rode the circuit (Trinidad, Grenada, Barbados and British Guiana) Campbell confined his riding to Trinidad and Tobago. He never had a weight problem, had a strong pair of hands, was beautifully balanced and a tremendous rider at the finish. All feared him, including the many Latin riders who came here in those days.

 

He also rode for the Pastime Stables, horses like Markline, Trumps, Triumph, Kymer, Lady Barcarolle, Mintips, Hungerton. His last winning ride in 1937 was astride Salvanos. Then Donald Campbell became a trainer of horses and young jockeys. Long before the Apprentice Jockey Scheme came to Trinidad and Tobago, Campbell then known to all as "PA" turned out such stalwarts as Manny Paul; Manny Lutchman; his son, Stephen Campbell; Abraham and Simon Joseph, Joseph 'Mice' Lutchman; Dalton Lutchman and Cyril 'Brothers' Lutchman; Nolan Hajal and the Hasranah brothers - Reno and Francis. To them all he was a father and he tutored them at no cost. Since his death on July 21, 1965, there has been a race named after him at the TTC Meeting at the Savannah every year open to apprentice riders only. All old timers feel Campbell surely deserves a place in the Hall of Fame.



Camps, Oliver Football 2008

Since assuming the presidency of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Federation in December 1992, Oliver Camps has overseen some of the greatest modern-day moments in the country's football history.

 

Trinidad and Tobago's historic debut at the 2006 World Cup, where it managed a 0-0 draw with Sweden in its opening match, was a collective moment that will be hard to be beat - certainly eclipsing the semi-final appearance at the 2000 CONCACAF Gold Cup and the six Caribbean Cup titles won during his term in charge. It was under Camps' leadership that Trinidad and Tobago hosted the 2001 FIFA World Under-17 Championship, which will always be remembered as an efficientlyorganised, well-attended competition. Trinidad and Tobago's participation at the 2007 World Under-17 tournament was an excellent followup to the heroics that took place in Germany the previous year.

 

Camps has also overseen the TTFF's 100th anniversary celebrations during 2008: a momentous occasion that was highlighted by an international friendly between Trinidad and Tobago and England that took place on June 1, in front of a crowd of 25,000 at Hasely Crawford Stadium in Port of Spain.

 

Beneath the international level, Camps presided over the official introduction of professional football in Trinidad and Tobago, starting with the existence of the Semi-Professional Football League (SPFL) - which lasted from 1995 to 1998 - the Professional Football League (1999- 2001) and the T&T Pro League, now in its seventh season. In 1994 he oversaw the creation of the zonal football associations that currently govern football at the lower echelons.

 

Even during his ascendancy along the football ladder, Camps was never far from the more outstanding moments of the recent past: he had multiple spells as national football team manager and was on hand to witness Trinidad and Tobago's marginal failures to qualify for the 1974 and 1990 World Cups.

 

Apart from being one of the founders of the Caribbean Football Union and chairman of the CONCACAF finance committee, Camps has also appointed to FIFA's Youth Development Committee in 2002.

 

Camps' career in sports administration all began in 1960 at Harvard Club, where he has served as president for the last 17 years and was general secretary for a quarter-century. During his term, he was responsible for the creation of youth development programs in football, cricket, rugby, basketball, tennis and women's hockey at the club



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Carew, Michael Cricket 1987

His initials bear some cricket significance but he has been known as "Joey" through out his cricket career. A left hand batsman who drove the ball crisply from his schoolboy days with Fatima College, he made his first class debut in 1956, scoring 8 and 17 against E.W Swanton's XI. He had to wait three years for another national chance and it came with a visit to Guyana, where he scored 114 v. Jamaica at Bourda adding 183 for the fourth wicket with Kenny Furlonge in the process. The West Indies hosted three international teams in the next three years and he hit 102* at the Queen's Park Oval and 70 at Guaracara Park against the 1960 M.C.C. team. The following year he scored 58 v. E.W. Swanton's team and in 1962, 55 and 11 against the Indians. There were some inter-territorial games too in which he scored 14 and 5, 6 and 76* in 1961 at home to Barbados and 4 and 34 v. Guyana, at Berbice batting in each case in the middle order.

 

Selected to tour Britain in 1963, he converted to the position of opening batsman, played in two Tests for 57 runs (av. 19.00) and totalled 1060 runs (av. 30.28) with one century - 117 v. Glamorgan, Cardiff. Three years later he was back but did not fare as well - 720 runs (av. 25.71) and one century - 132 v. Gloucestershire, Bristol.

 

But he was third time lucky. In 1969 on a shortened tour he scored 677 runs (av. 45.13), hit three centuries, the highest of which, 172*, saw him feature in an unfinished stand of 324 for the second wicket with Roy Fredericks at Leicester. The other centuries were: 126* v. Oxford and Cambridge at Oxford and 122 v. Somerset, Taunton. With the advent of Shell Shield Cricket in 1966 there were more inter-territorial game and he scored 25 and 66 v. Jamaica, 24 and 5 v. Barbados and 81 and 5 v. Combined Islands. His best score was made in partnership with Bryan Davis, the pair putting on 155. He was made national captain for the 1967 season and played through the innings for 65 against Barbados at the Queen's Park Oval. The following year while preparing for the visit by M.C.C. that pair gave their team Queen's Park a 398 run start v. Maple, a West Indies record. Scores of 26 and 90* for Trinidad and Tobago and 56 and 40* in the Fourth Test ensured a place on the team to tour Australia and New Zealand that winter.

 

He had outstanding performances in both countries. In the Test matches he scored 83 and 71* at Brisbane (First Test), sharing partnerships of 165 for the second wicket with Rohan Kanhai and 120 for the seventh wicket with Clive Lloyd; then 90 in the Fourth Test at Adelaide, where, with Kanhai he added 132 for the second wicket. Finally his 64 at Sydney in the Fifth Test gave the West Indies its first ever century start on that continent, with Roy Fredericks being the junior partner here. His series aggregate was 427 runs (av. 47.44) when he left for New Zealand. At Auckland he scored 109 to mark a debut century against that country. He added 172 for the second wicket with Seymour Nurse. The 91 he scored at Christchurch helped Nurse to increase the second wicket record to 231. His Test figures were 256 runs (av. 51.20). Trinidad and Tobago won the Shell Shield in 1970 and 1971. In 1970 he proved to be a one-man wrecking crew, with 523 runs (av. 87.16) and 13 wickets (av. 9.23), the lowest seasonal bowling average to date. He scored 143 v. Guyana, 164 and 101 v. Jamaica in successive innings at the Queen's Park Oval and put on 202 for the first wicket with Alvin Corneal in his final effort.

 

The following year he contributed handsomely to his team's repeat performance with 74 and 44* v. Jamaica, 52 v. Combined Islands, 91 and 18 v. Barbados, both at Port of Spain and 27 and 40, Bourda. Trinidad and Tobago defeated Barbados for the first time since 1945. By 1973, after 3 Tests each v. India (1971) and New Zealand (1972) he decided to retire, but not before he had scored with Deryck Murray to lay the cornerstone for another local victory over Barbados. Among his other achievements have been the R.K. Nunes trophy after the 1968/69 season, the WITCO Sportsman Award for the 1970 season and inclusion as one the five cricketers of the year by the Trinidad and Tobago Cricket Council six times; 1960, 1963, 1967, 1968, 1970 and 1971. Since retiring he has served on the West Indies Cricket Board of Control as one of the nation's representatives and later, as a selector.



Castanada-Phillip, Peggy C.M.T. Netball 2004

Trinidad and Tobago 1979 World Netball

Eleven countries participated in the first World Netball Championship was held at Chelsea College, Eastborne, England in 1963. Trinidad and Tobago was pitted against some of the best players in the world from countries such asAustralia, England, Jamaica, Scotland, Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) and New Zealand.Despite placing fourth in this inaugural Championship Games, the Trinidad and Tobago (T&T) team stood out because of its aerial style of play and created significant excitement amongst the crowd.The President and Secretary of the Trinidad and Tobago Netball Association were thrilled with the team’s performance.

 

Two years later, in 1965, T&T applied to the World Body, International Federation of Netball Associations (IFNA) to host the 5th World Netball Championship scheduled for 1979.T&T won the bid and the planning began for this massive activity with twin goals – to stage the first World Netball Championships in the West Indies and went on to become World Champions. At the end of the 1975 tournament, the team placed 4th and many thought it impossible for such a team to dominate the World Championship. One year later, the entire 1975 team and a few extras were invited to begin an intense training programme.

 

 

26 After three years of grueling training, the following persons were selected to the National Team:Sherril Peters (captain)Althea Luces (GK)Jennifer Williams (GK)Jean Pierre (GS)Peggy Castanada (GA)Cyrenia Charles (GS)Ingrid Blackman (GA)Angela Burke Browne (WA)Veryl A Kretschmar (WD)Heather Charleau (GD)Marcia Simsoy Frank (C)Jennifer Nurse (C) Led by captain Sherril Peters, the entire team signaled their intention to be championship leaders from their first appearance centre court and provided opponents and spectators alike with nail biting moments. The T&T/Australia Game was the thriller. The Aussie’s strategy was to concentrate their two defences on the experienced and talented shooter Jean Pierre while ignoring the unknown Cyrenia Charles.

 

This proved fatal and Cyrenia registered her first goal with a magnificent shot from the edge of the circle. Despite the attempt to obstruct Jean Pierre, she ended the tournament with the Top Shooter Title. The final score (Aus vs T&T) 40-38 in favour of T&T. The final game NZ vs T&T ended in a 32-27 score in favour of New Zealand resulting in a three-way victory – Trinidad and Tobago, New Zealand and Australia.The entire team received a National Award – the Chaconia Medal for outstanding performance and Jean Pierre was recalled for a second award – The Trinity Cross. To this day, they remain the only T&T team to have ever won a world title.



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Cayenne, Benedict Athletics 1995

Following the high achievements of Trinidad and Tobago's 400 meters athletes like Wendell Mottley, Kent Bernard, Edwin Roberts, Edwin Skinner and Lennox Yearwood in the early 1960's came another fine runner Benedict Cayenne.

 

Cayenne joined these athletes as Mottley, Skinner and Bernard were on the way out, but the durable Roberts still to emulate, he made his mark at International level. The Barrackpore born athlete became a member of the Police Service and first showed his prowess by winning a 5,000 metres event at the Police Championships in 1964.

 

That same year he entered the Maryland State University in the United States on an athletic scholarship but was always on call for his country. In 1966 he won a bronze medal at the Central American and Caribbean Games in Puerto Rico in the 800 metres and was a member of the Trinidad and Tobago team that won a silver medal in the 4 X 400 metres relay. At the Olympic Games in Mexico City in 1968, Cayenne stole a march in the 800 metres semi final, clocking a great 1.46.8 to reach the final. The effort may have left him a spent force and he finished eight in the final. He however had the honour of being one of the eight best men in the world over the distance. He also ran 4 X 400 relay when the national team finished sixth in the finals.

 

His great moment came in 1970 at the Commonwealth Games in Edinburgh, Scotland, when he took home the silver medal in the 800 metres and was in the 4 X 400 metres silver medal winning squad, Cayenne's next success was winning a bronze medal in 1971 with the national team in the 4 X 400 metres relay at the Pan Am Games in Colombia. He campaigned in Europe with Roberts, scoring wins over top athletes and later went to Philadelphia, U.S.A, where he became head coach at Swarthmore College.



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Chambers, George H.O. Football 2000

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Chandleur, Barbara Administrators 2000

This versatile sportswoman first attracted attention at Netball, while attending St Rose's Intermediate School. In 1948 she became the school's captain and led the school's club Venus to championship honours in the Port of Spain Netball League, capturing the Hayward Shield. The following year, her final at that school, she was Victrix Ludorum at their Athletics meeting. To this she added the Singles Championship Title in table tennis for all Intermediate and Secondary schools.

 

Barbara displayed her netball skills with reputable clubs Venus, Eton, Marians, Progressive and Rochdale which she founded and served as Head Coach. Those clubs, Eton excepted, each won the Port of Spain Netball League Championship. Up to 1967 when she retired from those courts, she played at national level in the years 1955, 1957, 1958, 1961, 1962 and 1963.

 

In 1962, the year on Independence, she served as captain of the National Team vs. All England in a Goodwill Netball Tourney held in Trinidad and Tobago. The following year she was vice captain of the National Team, which participated in the First World Netball Championships, held in Eastbourne, England. Trinidad and Tobago emerged in fourth place.

 

She could be found either at Centre, Wing Attack or Goal Attack during that period and in 1957, she was named (Golden Girl), the Sportswoman of the Year Award in the Port of Spain Netball League. She represented the League in many Inter-League and North vs. South Championship Titles, with the Northerners in winners row almost always.

 

After her playing days she served in Administration at Club Zonal and National levels. She was Secretary/Treasurer of the Caribbean Netball Association over period 1977 - 84. At International level she was Treasurer of the International Federation of Netball Associations 1975-79.



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Chapman, Alexander H.B.M. Administrators 1995

As a youth Alexander "Alex" Chapman participated in weightlifting with great enthusiasm.

 

As an administrator, official and international referee in later years, Chapman has undertaken countless assignments at the World Championships, Olympic Games and Caribbean Championships. His tireless contribution over the years has brought him honours at all levels including one of his most cherished awards a silver medal from the International Weightlifting Federation in recognition of 25 years contribution to the sport. This award was received at the Olympic Games in Munich in 1972.

 

Chapman's beginnings in weightlifting paralleled the start of a great era in the sport when some of the nation's best performers were just launching out in the mid-1940's. In addition to his participation in weightlifting, he held several administrative posts including delegate to the Trinidad and Tobago Weightlifting Association from 1946; the Association's secretary from 1949-1962 and president from 1964-1972. Among his initiatives was the formation of the West Indies Weightlifting Federation from 1959-1962 and as secretary of that organisation; he pioneered the staging of trials and selection of the West Indies Weightlifting Championships in 1950.

 

He was also Manager/Coach to the West Indies team at the Pan Am Games in Chicago in 1959, Trinidad and Tobago team to the Commonwealth Games in 1954, 1958 and 1962 and Pan Am Games in 1963. Chapman expanded his administrative services as treasurer and then secretary of the Trinidad and Tobago Olympic Association from 1963 to 1989 when he was elevated to the post of president. He was Chef de Mission to the national teams at the Olympic Games, Pan Am Games, Commonwealth Games and Central American and Caribbean Games. In March 1995 he was elected vice president of the CAC Sports Organisation. He is the recipient of the Humming Bird Medal for his services to sport.



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Charleau, Delbert Football 1987

He grew up in St. Madeleine Village and whilst still a schoolboy aged 15 at the R. C. School, appeared for Rochford in the SAFA. Upon leaving school he joined Lanes and played at inside right, then moved to Carlton, a team made up of many Thomsons and Turtons. It was there he moved to the half line (right half) at which position he stayed for the rest of his career. In 1964 he received his first inter-league call, representing SAFA against archrivals SAFL at Skinner Park.

 

A good performance led to his selection for South v. North in the Red Cross classic and his play was instrumental in a convincing 3-0 South victory. It must have also impressed the officials of UBOT with whom he obtained employment before the start of the 1947 season.

 

A good performance led to his selection for South v. North in the Red Cross classic and his play was instrumental in a convincing 3-0 South victory. It must have also impressed the officials of UBOT with whom he obtained employment before the start of the 1947 season. That year he made his national debut and played in all four matches- 2 each v. Guyana and Jamaica in a tournament won by Trinidad. The following year he went on tour of Suriname for a three match series which his team won, but for the visit by Haiti, the selectors opted for a team comprised entirely of North players and he was replaced by Julian Bolden at right half on a team which was unchanged throughout the tournament and remained for some inter-league games. They became known as the family eleven. When he was selected to tour Haiti in 1949, he grasped the opportunity in such fashion that the right half position was his thereafter, until retirement six years later. In 1950 Trinidad hosted a triangular tournament in which the local team played unbeaten against Curacao and Suriname. The next year he was on the squad, which made a successful tour of Guadeloupe.

 

By then he had formed liaisons both at club and national levels. Joined at left half by Doyle Griffith in both instances, they played with Ian 'Big Chief' Seale for UBOT, F.A. Champions in 1950, 1952 and 1954 and with Allan Joseph for Trinidad. That quartet was to visit England in 1953. But before that Delbert gained selection on the Caribbean Football Federation team, which assembled in Jamaica. It was the equivalent of a West Indies 'Test' cap. In addition to appearing for his league, zone and island at his fancied position, he developed another reputation. He was considered the 'spot kicker' for the teams and after being assigned with his first penalty in Paramaribo in 1948, when he obliged, was entrusted with that function subsequently. He never let his country down and disappointed his club only once when his shot struck an upright.

 

After retiring from club football in 1964 he coached UBOT during the following season then moved over to St. Benedict's College, La Romain for the ensuing four years. He also was coach to the Caroni team, which won the 1968 SFL Championships for the only time in the club's history. Except for the greying of his hair he looks much the same as he did during his playing days and had the satisfaction of seeing his daughter Heather represent Trinidad and Tobago in the Fifth World Netball Tournament in 1979.



Charleau, Heather C.M.T. Netball 2004

Trinidad and Tobago 1979 World Netball

Eleven countries participated in the first World Netball Championship was held at Chelsea College, Eastborne, England in 1963. Trinidad and Tobago was pitted against some of the best players in the world from countries such asAustralia, England, Jamaica, Scotland, Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) and New Zealand.Despite placing fourth in this inaugural Championship Games, the Trinidad and Tobago (T&T) team stood out because of its aerial style of play and created significant excitement amongst the crowd.The President and Secretary of the Trinidad and Tobago Netball Association were thrilled with the team’s performance.

 

Two years later, in 1965, T&T applied to the World Body, International Federation of Netball Associations (IFNA) to host the 5th World Netball Championship scheduled for 1979.T&T won the bid and the planning began for this massive activity with twin goals – to stage the first World Netball Championships in the West Indies and went on to become World Champions. At the end of the 1975 tournament, the team placed 4th and many thought it impossible for such a team to dominate the World Championship. One year later, the entire 1975 team and a few extras were invited to begin an intense training programme.

 

 

26 After three years of grueling training, the following persons were selected to the National Team:Sherril Peters (captain)Althea Luces (GK)Jennifer Williams (GK)Jean Pierre (GS)Peggy Castanada (GA)Cyrenia Charles (GS)Ingrid Blackman (GA)Angela Burke Browne (WA)Veryl A Kretschmar (WD)Heather Charleau (GD)Marcia Simsoy Frank (C)Jennifer Nurse (C) Led by captain Sherril Peters, the entire team signaled their intention to be championship leaders from their first appearance centre court and provided opponents and spectators alike with nail biting moments. The T&T/Australia Game was the thriller. The Aussie’s strategy was to concentrate their two defences on the experienced and talented shooter Jean Pierre while ignoring the unknown Cyrenia Charles.

 

This proved fatal and Cyrenia registered her first goal with a magnificent shot from the edge of the circle. Despite the attempt to obstruct Jean Pierre, she ended the tournament with the Top Shooter Title. The final score (Aus vs T&T) 40-38 in favour of T&T. The final game NZ vs T&T ended in a 32-27 score in favour of New Zealand resulting in a three-way victory – Trinidad and Tobago, New Zealand and Australia.The entire team received a National Award – the Chaconia Medal for outstanding performance and Jean Pierre was recalled for a second award – The Trinity Cross. To this day, they remain the only T&T team to have ever won a world title.



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Charles, Alfred Football 1984

Old stagers who saw him in his prime still speak of the brilliance of Alfred Charles, dubbed by the British Guiana football fans "King Charles" in the 1930's. And a king of football he truly was, although by all standards he had a short career on the local scene and a brief one as a professional with Burnley in England. Seen as a potential world rater by Learie Constantine in 1931, Charles was taken up by Burnley through Constantine's contacts. He proved to be a real giant, but a cartilage operation put an end to his career in the early 1940's.

 

As a boy at Newtown Boys' School, Charles towered over lads his age in sheer football skills. In 1921 he was considered the best boy footballer in Port of Spain. When he left school he played a few seasons in the Second Division of the Trinidad Amateur Football Association and in 1929 joined the famed Everton. There he partnered the versatile Arthur Maynard in the back line and the two became the most famous pair of defencemen in the history of Trinidad football.

 

Charles was such an outstanding player that Everton often used him in all the positions, depending on the game. He used to move up to the forward line when things were going bad for Everton and more often than not score for his team. In 1931 in British Guiana, he was put at centre-half. He shone like a beacon in that position and so amazed the Guianese that they christened him "King Charles". Charles played a bit of cricket for Shannon, but his talents in that field were nothing in the class of his football performances where he remains in the minds of many as the best footballer produced in Trinidad.



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Charles, Ashmad All Rounders 1984

Tall and powerful, Ahamad Charles was the ideal sportsman, the kind youngsters hero worship and imitate. Born in Siparia, he hardly ever departed from that small town image and was a genuine South hero in the 1930's and 1940's.

 

Charles had allround talent to burn. Although he made his mark at cycling and football, he was also quite competent at cricket and hockey. But for all his skill at games, Charles had a somewhat short period in the spotlight. At school he gave indications of great things in the future and he didn't disappoint his teachers. His school performances grew into top class displays when he went to work at Forest Reserve.

 

When he began as a cyclist, Laurie Rogers was king of the track. But in a few years time, as Rogers began to back pedal, Charles assumed the position of champion cyclist of Trinidad and the Caribbean. It was a period when the great Jamaicans, Hailes and Robb were considered the best wheelmen in the Caribbean. But at a meeting in Jamaica, Charles set out to prove otherwise. running a hot fever, he decided to stay out of a big race but was encouraged by his manager to make an effort. That day he beat the mighty Hailes in a grand stand finish and had to be taken away sick and weak after his victory. That was one of two major cycling displays in Charles' career.

 

The other was in a terrific finish with Rogers at Queen's Park Oval. As Charles drew alongside Rogers with 200 yards to go, his foot slipped off the pedal. Yet, with grit and determination, he fought to get his foot back on the pedal and with almost one leg pumping, rode to victory. At football, Charles was an elegant centre-half, considered by many to be among the three best players in that position ever to represent Trinidad. He was a fixture in the South teams of the 1930's and early 1940's and made centre-half virtually his own when the national team was chosen in those years. He also represented South at cricket and hockey with much distinction.



Charles, Cyrenia C.M.T. Netball 2004

Trinidad and Tobago 1979 World Netball

Eleven countries participated in the first World Netball Championship was held at Chelsea College, Eastborne, England in 1963. Trinidad and Tobago was pitted against some of the best players in the world from countries such asAustralia, England, Jamaica, Scotland, Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) and New Zealand.Despite placing fourth in this inaugural Championship Games, the Trinidad and Tobago (T&T) team stood out because of its aerial style of play and created significant excitement amongst the crowd.The President and Secretary of the Trinidad and Tobago Netball Association were thrilled with the team’s performance.

 

Two years later, in 1965, T&T applied to the World Body, International Federation of Netball Associations (IFNA) to host the 5th World Netball Championship scheduled for 1979.T&T won the bid and the planning began for this massive activity with twin goals – to stage the first World Netball Championships in the West Indies and went on to become World Champions. At the end of the 1975 tournament, the team placed 4th and many thought it impossible for such a team to dominate the World Championship. One year later, the entire 1975 team and a few extras were invited to begin an intense training programme.

 

 

26 After three years of grueling training, the following persons were selected to the National Team:Sherril Peters (captain)Althea Luces (GK)Jennifer Williams (GK)Jean Pierre (GS)Peggy Castanada (GA)Cyrenia Charles (GS)Ingrid Blackman (GA)Angela Burke Browne (WA)Veryl A Kretschmar (WD)Heather Charleau (GD)Marcia Simsoy Frank (C)Jennifer Nurse (C) Led by captain Sherril Peters, the entire team signaled their intention to be championship leaders from their first appearance centre court and provided opponents and spectators alike with nail biting moments. The T&T/Australia Game was the thriller. The Aussie’s strategy was to concentrate their two defences on the experienced and talented shooter Jean Pierre while ignoring the unknown Cyrenia Charles.

 

This proved fatal and Cyrenia registered her first goal with a magnificent shot from the edge of the circle. Despite the attempt to obstruct Jean Pierre, she ended the tournament with the Top Shooter Title. The final score (Aus vs T&T) 40-38 in favour of T&T. The final game NZ vs T&T ended in a 32-27 score in favour of New Zealand resulting in a three-way victory – Trinidad and Tobago, New Zealand and Australia.The entire team received a National Award – the Chaconia Medal for outstanding performance and Jean Pierre was recalled for a second award – The Trinity Cross. To this day, they remain the only T&T team to have ever won a world title.



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Charles-Montano, Sandra H.B.M. Hockey 1995

Like her father, the late Ahamed Charles, who was inducted into WITCO Sports Foundation Hall of Fame in 1984, Sandra Charles-Montano had a brilliant sports career.

 

Like her father, the late Ahamed Charles, who was inducted into WITCO Sports Foundation Hall of Fame in 1984, Sandra Charles-Montano had a brilliant sports career. She was outstanding at various sports, represented Trinidad and Tobago at hockey, tennis and badminton, and was awarded the Humming Bird Medal (Gold) in the 1974 National honours List for her contribution to the sport of hockey.

 

Apart from representing this country in over 100 hockey internationals, Sandra was also the highest goal scorer in the history of Caribbean women's hockey, and certainly in the history of the league hockey in Trinidad and Tobago. A speedy centre forward who used her stick with tremendous results in front of the goal post, Sandra showed her potential while at St. Peter's School, Pointe-a-Pierre. She graduated to the Pointe-a-Pierre ladies team which travelled to Port of Spain to contest the women's national competitions and even as a youngster was always a formidable striker.

 

At the age of 16 Sandra was in the national team that won the first ever regional hockey tournament among juniors scoring three hat tricks and was the leading goal scorer as Trinidad and Tobago won the tournament. A year later she won her cap in the senior national team for the triangular tournament in Jamaica which Trinidad and Tobago won. Then in 1967 she travelled to Germany with the national team for the World Tournament. Following her superb performances season after season in domestic, regional and international competition, she stopped competitive hockey in 1978 leaving behind scoring records that may never be broken by another female national this century.



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Cipriani, Michael All Rounders 1984

Mickey Cipriani was a born adventurer who became perhaps the most gifted sportsman ever produced in Trinidad. A high spirited young man of many talents, he participated in an assortment of sports as a youth, often moving from one big event to another within days, and maintaining fine form throughout his sporting escapades.

 

He played cricket, football, rugby; he was a track and field athlete, an outstanding swimmer and fine amateur boxer. But above all, he was a great cyclist, probably the best this country had produced up to 1925.

 

Early in his career, he was the country's top sprinter in track and field. But this great sportsman amazed sports enthusiasts by leaving the running track during a meeting to enter a cycle race, which he duly won. By 1910 he was champion cyclist of Trinidad and the name Mickey Cipriani was known throughout the Caribbean. Between meetings he found time to play football, cricket, and rugby, depending on the season. What was really astonishing was that Cipriani reached a very high standard in all those sports. His restless spirit took him abroad with the Local Forces during World War 1 and when he returned he tried a comeback as a cyclist. The grand BSA Challenge Trophy was what mattered to Cipriani for he had won this prize on two previous occasions along with Alec Smith and Arthur Leiba. The big nine-mile cycle event at Queen's Park Oval in 1920 brought these cyclists together again, the winner to keep the BSA Trophy.

 

But Willie Agard upset the field and won, Cipriani placing second. After the meeting Cipriani retired from the cycle track but continued to play football for Local Forces and cricket for Queen's Park. His colourful and controversial personality drew large crowds to games in which he played. It was no surprise when Cipriani became the forerunner in aviation in Trinidad. No one was startled when he took to the air but few anticipated it would be his undoing. In 1934 while flying with a friend between Trinidad and Tobago, his aircraft crashed in the Northern Range and to this day the aircraft has never been found.



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Constantine, Learie Cricket 1984

Statistics very often find a way to devalue genuine quality, especially in sport. And in the case of Learie Constantine, figures truly misrepresent this colourful and dynamic cricketer, who for over two decades, never failed to amaze followers of the game, both in the Caribbean and overseas. The grandson of a slave, Learie willingly followed his father's footsteps onto the cricket greens, at first at Diego Martin in west Port of Spain, and later on at the Queen's Park Oval where he gave warning from very young that he would someday write his name boldly in the cricket books of the world.

 

Thus, he became the first superstar in Caribbean sport, the first sportsman of the region to be internationally recognised as a world-class performer. His legendary performances for Trinidad and West Indies do not always carry record breaking figures, but those who were privileged to witness them never ceased speaking of the fire and magnetism Constantine infused into his batting, bowling and fielding. He first played for Trinidad in 1921, a year later his father, Leburn was also in the team, and shortly after he toured with the West Indies team to England. He returned there in 1928 when West Indies played their first Test match, and took 4 for 82. Though his statistics reveal little when placed alongside other great all rounders, Constantine ended his Test career in style in the third and final Test at The Oval, London, 1939 against England, when he took 5 for 75 and scored 79 runs.

 

During his first class career (1922-1945) he scored 4,451 runs with five centuries, and took 424 wickets and 133 catches, most of them unbelievable efforts. He scored 635 runs in Test and captured 58 wickets. Later, Constantine became a Minister in the Government of Trinidad and Tobago, and was knighted in 1961 and became a Life Peer in 1969.



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Constantine, Lebrun Cricket 1984

In the last years of the 19th century, when cricket was taking shape in the Caribbean as a new social dimension, Lebrun Constantine stood tall among players in Trinidad. An overseer on an estate in Diego Martin, Constantine had a passion for the game. Learning a great deal from English plantation owners who played the game on the island.

 

Constantine sought as much knowledge about the game and the great players of the past as he could grasp and was a self-taught exponent with the bat and ball.

 

Known as Old Cons, after his son, the famous Learie Constantine began to make his mark on the green fields, Lebrun was in the first West Indies team to tour England, under Aurcher Warner, and hit a brilliant 113 against MCC, the nearest game to a Test match on the tour, becoming the first West Indian to score a century at Lord's. A specialist wicket- keeper, Constantine did well on that first tour to England, with both bat and gloves, but when he returned to that country with Harold Austin's team in 1906, he had given up wicket keeping. He had already given his home crowd a taste of his fine batting technique when in 1902 he hit 84 at Queen's Park Oval for the West Indies against R.A. Bennett's visiting English side.

 

In 1911 he scored a fine 53 against A.P.F. Somerset's team at the Oval and in 1913 scored 61 again at the Oval against the visiting MCC team, again led by Somerset. Old Cons was a disciplinarian who licked the opposition first and smiled after. He developed excellent qualities in his sons, Learie and Elias, the former becoming one of cricket's greatest personalities, the latter becoming a fine player for Trinidad in the 1940's. Constantine was one of the pioneers of Trinidad and West Indies cricket, a man who loved the game and played it with great enthusiasm and skill and may have had Test cricket status for West Indies in his day.



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Cooke, Ken Hockey 1985

During the golden age of Football in Trinidad, just after the Second World War, the Queen's Park Savannah was a second home for many football fans, who would converge on afternoons in front of the Grand Stand to watch the first class games.

 

Due to the fervour with which the crowds would follow the games, the police often had to intervene when spectators encroached on the playing field. One central and popular figure was often there, stately on horseback, always smiling and discreet with the fans. His name was Ken Cooke and he knew just how the football enthusiasts felt for he was a first division footballer and hockey player. Off his mount and into sporting garb Ken played at left fullback for Colts before he became a policeman. He found some reliable partners in the force and played with Ossie Edmund in the Second Division of TAFA in 1945 and 1946, when Police gave Malvern its toughest battle. In 1947 he moved to South and represented South Amateur Football Association with Silbert Hyndman as the other back.

 

But it was at hockey that he was to make his greatest impact. Playing for Police, he soon formed a good understanding with Russell Toppin and both would be in the team for the North v. South games, which were usually played at alternate venues, twice per year. First he partnered Nuni Arthur and the pair was selected for Cooke's intercolonial debut in 1945. Afterwards he represented the island in every hockey tournament undertaken by the local body until 1960. He had a succession of partners but he remained at left back. For example for the visit to British Guiana in 1950 the other back was Henry Young of Chinese. A year earlier when the Guianese played in Trinidad Police defeated them with the aid of national players Cooke and Toppin backs, Herbert, Glashier and Piggott forwards. Apart from Toppin they all went to Guiana the following year.

 

Ken excelled in the short corner as a hitter. Playing centre-forward for Police and North was Earl Austin who stopped the short corner 'dead' for Cooke to convert and it was a ploy that seldom failed to bring results. When the tournaments extended to triangular with Jamaica entering and Barbados next to become quadrangular, he held his own against all comers. Known affectionately as "Phaley", his last intercolonial participation was at the tournament in Jamaica, 1960, when he was a member of the winning Trinidad and Tobago team and was selected to represent the rest against a West Indies combination.



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Corneal, Alvin Football 1987

A naturally gifted left-handed sportsman, Alvin Corneal was one of Trinidad and Tobago's most brilliant footballers, a cricketer who could well have played for West Indies had there been less talent in the Caribbean team during his time, and a table tennis ace who, given greater concentration in the game would surely have been a national champion, or close to one. But it was at football he raised to really great heights and it is the game he admits he loves best. Knowledgeable and scientifically adept in the game, he was a national player from quite young. He was only 17 and a student at Fatima College when he represented Trinidad and Tobago against an English All-Amateur team in 1954.

 

In fact, Corneal was a stripling of 16 when he lined up in the North-South Red Cross Cup match of 1953 and thus, played in every one of these classic between 1953-1968 for both North and South, except the 1959 match.

 

A member of the first Caribbean team that toured the United Kingdom in 1959, Corneal netted six goals on the tour and despite being one of the youngest members of the team he was regarded as one of the key figures in the side. He played mainly at left-wing but during his best days he was used as a striker and his two powerful kicking feet often left goal-keepers in no-man's land at all levels of the game.

 

After leaving school Corneal went to the South and took up a job with TPD, then one of the most powerful football outfits in Trinidad and Tobago. He returned to Port of Spain on many occasions, either with his club or with the South team, and reminded North football fans of his splendid soccer qualities with skilful displays and excellent goals with either foot. Corneal's love for football meant that he read a great deal about the game and few, if any of his contemporaries, studied the fundamentals and higher skills more than he did.

 

He returned to Port of Spain in the early 1960's and lined up with Maple, then a magnificent side, led by Sedley Joseph. And Corneal played no small part in Maple's tremendous successes in those times as they perfected the new 4-2-4 system and others close to it with efficiency and results. Around this time also, Corneal was a regular member of the national cricket team and proved to be a fine opening batsman or a higher-order batsman who helped Trinidad and Tobago's team re-develop after a slump in the 1950's. He was a member of the Shell Shield champion teams of 1970 and 1971, skippered by Joey Crew with whom he battered the Jamaican bowling in the memorable opening partnership in 1970. But football remained Corneal's first love and he continued with the national team and Maple and was eventually named coach of the Trinidad and Tobago Youth team in 1969. In 1967 he helped Trinidad & Tobago to win a bronze medal at the CONCACAF tournament in Canada.

 

Corneal became national senior coach in 1980 when Trinidad and Tobago became champions of the Caribbean Football Union's tournament for the first time. Even after his best years were behind him, Corneal used to appear for Maple for a final ten minutes or so in first class matches, and on more than one occasion netted the winning goal for his team (one a hat-trick) when his younger teammates failed to do so. Corneal is now a leading sports analyst and commentator on radio, television and in the press as he continues to bring to the nation his authoritative views.



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Crawford, Hasely T.C. Athletics 2000

One of the most thrilling moments in sport for Trinidad and Tobago transpired on the afternoon of July 24, 1976 in Montreal, Canada, when a powerful son of the soil won the gold medal in the 100-metres sprint at the Olympic Games. As it turned out, it was the golden glory for Hasely Crawford, his first, and alas, his last great moment of the track, if the big games are to be the yardstick by which his class is to be measured.

 

But that one great moment was enough to make Crawford the finest athlete to have ever represented Trinidad and Tobago at any games, given the worth of his success. That he never won gold again at any other games was the result of injuries from time to time, as the big six-foot, one-inch sprinter from San Fernando battled with muscle trouble. Crawford hit the spotlight at the Southern Games, Pointe-a-Pierre in 1970 and was selected in the national team for the Central American and Caribbean Games in Panama, where he was a member of the 4 x 100 metres relay team which placed third. Later that year he won a bronze medal in the 100-metres at eh Commonwealth Games in Edinburgh, Scotland, clocking 10.33 seconds. A new sprint star was on the scene.

 

The young Crawford reached the 100-metres final in Munich in1972 when he got into his starting blocks with a torn hamstring and pulled up after ten metres. It was a great disappointment for the youth who proved his class three years later in Mexico at the Pan Am Games where he ran second to the great Silvio Leonard in the 100-metres. But his biggest day was yet to come. Running like a well-treated motor as the Olympics of 1976 began, Crawford entered the 100-metres final in the company of the worldís best sprinters. At the start he has his back to the starting line, contemplating his strategy and building his confidence. He was well off at the pistol and even the great Don Quarry of Jamaica, defending Olympic champion, Valery Borzov of the Soviet Union, and the swift-travelling American, Harvey Glance, could not get at him as he strode across the finish to give his country its greatest ever athletics prize.

 

In addition to his glorious honour, Crawfordís name was given to a new commercial jet airliner, inaugurated that same day in Tobago, and he received the nationís premier honour, the Trinity Cross. Crawford had another eights years of top class sprinting left, but following a breakdown in the 100-metres final at Montreal, he was never again at the helm at the big games. He won a bronze medal at the Commonwealth Games at Edmonton, Canada in 1978 behind Quarry and Allan Wells of Scotland and took a silver medal with the Trinidad and Tobago team in the 4 x 100 metres relay. He reached the quarterfinals in the 100-metres at the Moscow Olympics in 1980 when some of his critics were ready to write him off and then reached the semi-finals in the 100-metres at the Commonwealth Games in Brisbane, Australia in 1982.

 

With still some steam left in his stride, Crawford was able to make the national team for the Olympics in Los Angeles in 1984 where he was just edged out of a semi-final place. His international career ended there. Apart from the great games Crawford had successes at international level over the years, mainly his stirring win over the great American sprinter, Steve Williams at Arima in front of his home fans. Whatever may be said about his one great success, Crawford has represented Trinidad and Tobago at four Olympiads, a magnificent feat in itself.

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Cropper, Siobhan Swimming 2004

Siobhan Cropper began swimming competitively at the age of ten and immediately got down to the business of dominating her rivals. Along with the victories came national records at all strokes and age groups. In 1993, at the age of 15, she attained silver medals in both the 20 and 100 metres freestyle competitions at the Central American and Caribbean (CAC) Games in Ponce, Puerto Rico. That same year she established a CCCAN Championships record of 26.88 seconds in the 50 metres freestyle in Havana, Cuba.

 

In 1996, as an 18-year-old student of St Joseph Convent, Port of Spain, Cropper established a first by becoming the first Trinidadian swimmer to advance to a final at the Olympic Games in Atlanta. She finished 8th in the 50-metre freestyle. The following year, she matched that achievement in the same category at the World Short Course Championships in Gothenburg, Sweden. She later won an athletic scholarship to Stanford University in California where she spent four years competing for the Cardinal. The year 1998 was a particularly big one for Cropper who established a CAC Games record of one minute 3.91 seconds in the 100 butterfly in Maracaibo, Venezuela. At the Caribbean Islands Swimming Championships (CISC) in Barbados, she rattled off meet records in the 50 freestyle (26.92), 100 freestyle (58.44) and 100 butterfly (1:04.09).

 

At the Pan American Games in Winnepeg, the following year, Cropper posted another meet record of 1:02.76 in the 100 butterfly. In 1999, Cropper also helped set a Stanford school record of 1:30.05 in the 200-yard freestyle relay along with teammates Gabrielle Rose, Sylvia Bereknyei and Catherine Fox.Cropper competed in her second Olympic Games in Sydney in 2000 in three events, the 50 and 100 freestyle and 100 metres butterfly. This time she failed to make it to the final in any of the three events. Cropper graduated from Stanford in 2001 with a degree in economics and ended a swimming career that also included FINA world ranking in the top 100 in the 50 and 100 freestyle (short and long course), 50 butterfly (short and long) and 100 butterfly (short).

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Cumberbatch, George M.O.M. Administrators 2004

George Cumberbatch’s pursuit of football and boxing during the 1940s and 50s was typical of an era in which multi-sport athletes were very commonplace in Trinidad and Tobago. In his formative years he played football and as he entered his teens became an all-round sportsman. Over the course of an 18-year football career Cumberbatch spent two years at Sporting Club and later a decade at local giant, Maple, in the first division of the Trinidad Amateur Football Association (TAFA). He won the National FA Trophy with Maple in 1953.Having acquired a football referee’s licence at the age of 17, prior to his graduation from Queen’s Royal College, Cumberbatch easily made the transition 21 years later to arbitration at the end of his playing career.

 

Apart from playing football, he had also boxed and after hanging up his boots and gloves, he took up refereeing both sports.He eventually graduated as a FIFA referee lecturer in Great Britain in 1956. His burgeoning second career in sport officialdom began with his accompaniment of the Trinidad and Tobago team to the Commonwealth Games in Vancouver, British Colombia in 1954 and reached another high point with his appointment as the assistant manager of the National (now Hasely Crawford) Stadium in Port of Spain, a year before the facility’s 1982 opening. Cumberbatch, who served as Trinidad and Tobago Postmaster General, also served as an administrator in football, boxing and netball. Among other studies, he pursued a Diploma in Sports Administration and Control at White City in the United Kingdom and other management courses.

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Cumberbatch, J.R.N., H.B.M. Athletics 1984

During the golden years of sprinters in Trinidad and Tobago (1930's) J.R.N. Cumberbatch reigned supreme.

 

He was national sprint Champion from 1933 -1939; among some of the finest sprinters this country has ever produced. In addition, he was regarded as the most outstanding sprinter in the Region, having raced virtually unbeaten in the 100 and 220 yards from 1935 to 1938. He was the holder of the Trinidad and West Indies records at both distances.

 

When he went to Australia in 1938 to represent the country at the British Empire Games, he had to sail for many days and arrived only to be put into competition without much preparation. Even so, he reached the semi-finals in the 100 yards. A week later he was beating men who had defeated him in Australia, as he competed at meetings in New Zealand. In 1939 Cumberbatch won a bronze medal in the British Amateur Athletic Championships held in White City. The gold medal was won by the Empire Games Champion; Cyril Holmes while the silver went to Martin Osendorp, 100 metres bronze medallist in the Berlin Olympics, 1936. Cumberbatch was a fine upright sprinter, strong, elegant and fast. He started as a boy at Tranquility School and Queen's Royal College where he was the outstanding athlete in his day.

 

It was a time when the country turned out many fine sprinters each year and, by 1932, Cumberbatch had assumed the title of sprint champion of Trinidad, a much-envied crown. His career is sprinkled with excellent performances and records and his speed took him to victories both at home and throughout the Caribbean. Cumberbatch was also a cricketer of some skills, having represented QRC against Harrison College of Barbados in 1927 in Barbados. He also played football for his college. Later in his career, he became am administrator on the local athletics scene.



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Cummings, Everard H.B.M. Football 1987

Everard Cummings was a brilliant schoolboy footballer who wasted little time in establishing himself as one of the front line players of the 1960's and 1970's as a revolution of soccer systems hit the game in Trinidad and Tobago. But although he has been an advocate for years of "total" football and of the most modern methods, Cummings would have fitted into any system ever played in this country and would have made a national team of any era. As a boy living in the heart of the city he made the Queen's Park Savannah his second home. He entered Fatima College at the time when collegeís football had hit a high mark and the magnificent St. Benedict's College side from South Trinidad was rolling over all challengers.

 

But the South team discovered one thing when they came up against Fatima, and that was; they had to play against twelve men since young Everard played twice as well as anyone else in the Fatima team.

 

So outstanding was he that Paragon called him into their side in the senior class competition. And at the tender age of 16, Cummings got his chance in the national team. He was an obvious choice in the Trinidad and Tobago colleges team that won the Caribbean championships in 1966 and was just 18 when he played in the national team in the regional qualifying round in the CONCACAF series in Jamaica and Hounduras.

 

By 1974 Cummings was an experienced and well-rounded midfield player as he lined up for the World Cup qualifying matches in Haiti. But as the story goes, Trinidad and Tobago failed to qualify for the finals in West Germany when only one match away, as questionable refereeing in the game against Haiti robbed the country of a chance. Later that year Cummings joined the Mexican league and played in that country for three years. It was his second chance as a professional as he had signed up in 1967-1970 with the Atlanta Chiefs in the North American League. Then in 1970 he signed up for four years with the famous New York Cosmos for whom he became a top player following in the footsteps of the two superstars, Pele and Franz Beckenbauer.

 

Between 1977 and 1980 Cummings was a member of the touring Phoenix side, and the Caribbean All Stars pros. His ambition to play pro soccer at a high level was truly realised, as he was the most successful player in this realm to emerge from Trinidad and Tobago. With his playing days as a first class professional coming to a close, Cummings turned his eyes to coaching. His rise in this regard was not as swift to the heights as he climbed as a player, but his ideas and beliefs were always progressive and he gradually made his way up the ladder. As Trinidad and Tobago mounted their challenge towards the World Cup in Italy in 1990, Cummings arrived positively as a first class coach and was appointed as the man to take the national side to the finals. His moves did not at once satisfy everyone, but he stuck to his "guns" and the march on to Italy can be seen now by the nation as a blitz as Cummings led the way.

 

The youth has grown in stature and confidence and it is now his hope that what he missed in Haiti in 1974 as a player with one step to go into the World Cup finals, will be realised this year, now that he is coach. Cummings has had his share of honours through the years, having been voted Trinidad and Tobago Football Association's player of the year in 1964, 1965 and 1973. In 1973 he was named West Indian Tobacco Sports Foundation sportsman of the year jointly with Bernard Julien (cricket) and the following year Cummings received the Humming Bird (Gold) Medal at the Independence Day honours for his contribution to football.

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